Graffiti Artists Seek Injunction On Terry Gilliam Film

click image to enlarge
August 14, 2014 | 7:26am EST

Three graffiti artists have launched a lawsuit in a bid to block the release of Terry Gilliam’s new movie The Zero Theorem, alleging producers have copied their work.
Argentinian artists Franco Fasoli, known as ‘Jaz’, Nicolas Escalada, AKA ‘Ever’, and Canadian Derek Mehaffey, known as ‘Other’, accuse the film-makers of ripping off a huge mural they created in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
They hold the copyright to the work, titled Castillo, which is one of the star attractions in the city’s famous ‘zona de graffiti’ (street art zone), but in court papers filed in Illinois on Wednesday they allege Gilliam’s team copied it for the film.
The trio insists a mural which features in The Zero Theorem is “a blatant misappropriation” of Castillo, according to The Hollywood Reporter.
The lawsuit adds, “The Copyrighted Artwork has achieved international recognition in the art world, and is widely recognised by the public in Argentina and abroad. Castillo is so important that it is one of the few public artworks that have survived for years in that particular zona de graffiti.”
The three artists are suing Voltage Pictures, Amplify Releasing and other defendants. They are demanding an injunction on the movie, which is due for release next week, damages and costs.

  Share/Bookmark

Comments are closed.


Responses are currently closed, but you can trackback from your own site.