Ricky Gervais Fights Back After Joking About Nude Photo Hacking Scandal

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September 1, 2014 | 6:55pm EST

Controversial British comedian Ricky Gervais found himself under attack on Monday after cracking a joke about the headline-grabbing celebrity nude photo leak on Twitter.com.
The privacy of actresses including Jennifer Lawrence and Mary Elizabeth Winstead and model Kate Upton was violated on Sunday after intimate snaps of the stars surfaced online, with the mystery hacker responsible for the leak claiming to be in possession of similar pictures of more than 100 famous females.
FBI agents have been called in to investigate the leak, while lawyers for both Lawrence and Upton have threatened to prosecute anyone who posts the stolen snaps on the Internet.
Gervais offered up his thoughts about the Hollywood scandal in a post on Twitter on Monday, writing, “Celebrities, make it harder for hackers to get nude pics of you from your computer by not putting nude pics of yourself on your computer.”
However, his attempt to make light of the situation only angered followers, with many taking aim at Gervais for appearing to blame the victims for the leak.
The offensive post has since been deleted, but Gervais fired back at his detractors by making it clear he was not condoning the hacking.
In a series of follow-up tweets, he wrote, “Making a joke about a thing doesn’t mean you condone that thing…
“Of course the hackers are 100 (per cent) to blame but you can still makes (sic) jokes about it. Jokes don’t portray your true serious feelings on a subject…”
Attempting to draw a line under the controversy, he then concluded with the message, “Make jokes, not war.”
Meanwhile, Harry Potter star Emma Watson and actress Patricia Arquette have followed in Lena Dunham’s footsteps by condemning the hacker online and urging fans not to view the stolen snaps.
Taking to her Twitter blog, Watson writes, “Even worse than seeing women’s privacy violated on social media is reading the accompanying comments that show such a lack of empathy”, and Arquette adds, “Every time someone opens a stolen intimate nude photo of anyone. They are becoming a sexual molester. Participating in a group molestation. Please explain why it is alright to look at someones private stolen intimate images (sic)?”

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